Peuples visibles

Revue de presse consacrée à l'actualité autochtone. Par Dominique Charron.

Indigenous women walking entire Mississippi River to raise awareness of water pollution’s impact

"The walkers and their supporters left Lake Itasca State Park, Minn., March 1 after a traditional Ojibwe water ceremony where they collected a copper pail full of clear, fresh lake water, which they are carrying the entire 1,200 miles to where the river empties into the Gulf at Venice, La. It is here that they will pour the contents of the pail into the murky gulf waters, “giving the Mississippi River a drink of herself.”Mississippi River Water Walk 2013 leader Sharon Day is a member of the Ojibwe tribe and executive director of the Indigenous Peoples Task Force, an organization whose mission is to improve the health and education of indigenous people through a variety of programs. She lives just a block from the river in St. Paul, Minn., and has been involved in water issues in the past, being called upon to help with the process of making a spring in the Fort Snelling area of the Twin Cities a protected sacred site in 1998.Day explained that the Mississippi, like all other rivers and waterways around the world, is facing peril due to pollution. (…)”

(Daily Gate City - 02/03/2013 - via David Tséoué)

Indigenous women walking entire Mississippi River to raise awareness of water pollution’s impact

"The walkers and their supporters left Lake Itasca State Park, Minn., March 1 after a traditional Ojibwe water ceremony where they collected a copper pail full of clear, fresh lake water, which they are carrying the entire 1,200 miles to where the river empties into the Gulf at Venice, La. It is here that they will pour the contents of the pail into the murky gulf waters, “giving the Mississippi River a drink of herself.”

Mississippi River Water Walk 2013 leader Sharon Day is a member of the Ojibwe tribe and executive director of the Indigenous Peoples Task Force, an organization whose mission is to improve the health and education of indigenous people through a variety of programs. She lives just a block from the river in St. Paul, Minn., and has been involved in water issues in the past, being called upon to help with the process of making a spring in the Fort Snelling area of the Twin Cities a protected sacred site in 1998.

Day explained that the Mississippi, like all other rivers and waterways around the world, is facing peril due to pollution. (…)”

(Daily Gate City - 02/03/2013 - via David Tséoué)